Thursday, February 22, 2018

Thursday 22nd February

Sun and frozen lawn, you would think that the weather forecasters are predicting the weather from hell for next week - cold, cold, cold. But for the moment I sort out primroses and primulas in the garden, potting them up into the planters.  Happy to find that they have quietly multiplied.This little plant is the Barnhaven gold laced, but not sure which I have maybe the silver laced, whichever it is prolific.  There is a double pink primrose, and a whole pile of a yellow (too bright, a fault I find with most polyanthus) plant, so for this short space of time it is the world of these related plants.  No real wild primrose, but I have planted a couple of cowslips in the front. I hate it when the pale lemon of the primrose is coloured by a mating with another cultivated specieman so that you get a murky pink.


The one problem in this garden is the creeping buttercup, the garden was once after all a field, so that this plant has taken over the long bed and lawns.  Hopefully I will be able to dig properly soon, but this infestation makes me cross.
A couple of days ago I ordered some perennial geraniums from a nursery in Walsall, the Paypal went through but no acknowledgement from the nursery, so I started to worry that maybe he had gone out of business, but a reply last night reassured me that he had got my order and I would get the plants I ordered. 
Love this plant for its many forms, the sight of bees around its flowers and also its leaf shape and hopefully its strong habit will provide good ground cover against the wretched buttercup.


8 comments:

  1. I used to have a lot of EA Bowles - a perennial geranium - in my last garden. It is so prolific that I see it everywhere. I am trying to think positive about Mares Tail which is in my unplanted garden (the lady was not a gardener). Maybe it isn't that much worse than ground elder and creeping buttercup.

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    1. The art of accepting wild flowers (i.e.weeds) is a very difficult path to take!

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  2. I saw my first wild primroses last week in a sunny sheltered spot at the edge of the road. Quite a heart warming sight.
    Arilx

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    1. I just love the wild primrose, not many round here but I have noticed a patch on the roadside.

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  3. That plant is a beauty. We had some very warm weather for a few days and my Retired Man told we that when he went out to feed the birds he saw that quite a few of my spring bulbs and plants are rising in the gardens. I need to go look for my Primroses as they are usually the first to bloom. None of mine, though, are as beautiful as yours.

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    1. That of course is the sheer pleasure of early spring, the small green shoots of bulbs. The most famous primroses/primulas are the Barnhaven primroses in France, who are now getting ready to display their plants.

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  4. The narrow strips I have tried to transform into a flowering space are infested with a variety of nearly evergreen creeping weeds--I'm never going to win the battle--don't know why I continue to subject elderly knees to the weeding and grubbing.

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  5. I am having the same problem about kneeling, in fact I can't with my ankle now. We strive against the impossible ;)

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