Thursday, May 13, 2021

13th May 2021

Stoney Littleton entrance stone


Well I have probably got it wrong so apologies to Tom about missing ammonites.  But Stoney Littleton long barrow was a great favourite of mine.  So I went and found it in my blog posts.  How I studied and dreamed of those long barrows that had disappeared in the valley around this particular long barrow.  It was August 2007, and then as I read through the blog, written in my usual na├»ve 
enthusiasm I saw there was one comment at the end, it was from Paul/Littlestone, at the very start of our relationship.  Here I must add much to the horror of my daughter (mum be careful of online chats!) Later on we met at a social gathering at Avebury and everything developed from there.



Strangely enough I was chatting to our lady window cleaner yesterday and we talked of grief.  She had lost her much younger husband to cancer three years ago, and had two large dogs to keep her company, one of which was in the van because he was needy;)  As we chatted it turned out that she was a Jehovah Witness, but seemed to believe that humans should live forever to experience this wonderful world.  When down to earth me said, ALL THE PEOPLE, wasn't it easier to listen to the young crow fledglings in the copse, knowing that they will be born, live and die.  I have read a lot about spiritual beliefs and accept we must all believe in what we believe, it is not for me to scoff, or that matter for you;) Paul never knew she was JW or he would have argued it out with her, but she is a gentle soul making a living by cleaning windows (could do better though).


Acceptance of grief is impossible, you live with it, it breaks through the wall stabbing the heart with its pain, but in the end most of us have to face up to it, the tears a relief.

So the blog I wrote on that day 14 years ago. I took Paul up to my favourite place later on, we explored so much together round the area of Wiltshire, especially churches, and so that whole frame of happy memories linger on. So this is for me!




19 comments:

  1. Such a rich area in heritage and history. Those wild poppies are some of my favorites.

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    1. Hi Tabor, It is has the three great stone circles, Avebury, Stonehenge and Stanton Drew. The red poppies are of course very symbolic of war in this country, and they become rare now in our fields. But Stoney Littleton is just that - stony and difficult to grow crops in.

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  2. My dear Thelma - a lovely thoughtful post - seems we are all in thoughtful mood today (see Tom). On the subject of grief - I think we all accept it in different ways - I have been widowed twice - once thirty years ago and once four years ago. These feelings of grief still descend from both happy marriages - quite out of the blue and for no apparent reason. I can ony live through them and come out the other side strengthened by my feelings of the happy times.

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    1. I suppose my philosophy takes in Yin and Yang, two opposites balancing each other Pat. Happiness will meet its match in unhappiness but neither are permanent.

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  3. Thelma, I didn't know you met Paul through your blog. That's a lovely story to share. I am glad you have many happy memories to comfort you. You know so many interesting things!

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  4. Yes Ellen, Paul loved poetry and had his own blog on which he collected poems. I think we started talking there, a shared interest in poetry.

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  5. What a lovely way to meet, through your shared interests. I met Keith in our local, doing the Telegraph crossword together with a group of friends.

    You must miss Wessex so much. I would love to go to Avebury again, but can't see it happening this year. I hope that the happy memories are balm for your grief. Thinking of you.

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    1. Well Jennie I have grown old in the intervening years, walking great lengths not so easy now, though my daughter has promised long walks along the river from Hebden Bridge to Todmorden.

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  6. Your first photo is very beautiful with all the poppies. I have yet to visit Stoney Littleton, but am sure I will get there one day. Arilx

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    1. It is a long way to drive to Aril from where you live, but as Jennie says Wessex is a place to visit for all things prehistoric.

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  7. I am going to read this again tomorrow.

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    1. You don't have to, but S/L brings back such sharp memories, Wellow is a very pretty place.

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    2. I have not been to Wellow for a long time, but I ought to visit again soon. A friend of mine now runs the pub there. I remember the ammonite at Stoney Littleton to be a positive one, not a negative impression like the one in your photo. Maybe it was the positive one which was stolen? I don't know anymore. I can't bear to think of losing the one closest to me.

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    3. There was a seam of rock I think running through the town of Keynsham which produced ammonites. Saint Keyne is one who banished the snakes, which ammonites are supposed to represent, as in Whitby when Saint Hilda threw the stone ammonites/snakes over the cliff! that always makes me laugh..

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  8. All the photography is lovely, and so is this new to me story.

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  9. I always admire the way you write Joanne, we learn so much from other countries.

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  10. We don't live forever though. We spend our time, and then it is spent. It has always been so. It will be so long after we are gone, unless we destroy the world we inhabit. I view us all as threads in an ever growing tapestry.

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  11. I forgot to add, I'm sorry for your grief. There is nothing that speaks more clearly to a life well spent than to be grieved when you are gone.

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  12. Wise words Debby, I am glad I found your blog.

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Love having comments!